The Flower Girls

Twisted.

It is the one word that keeps echoing in my mind when I think about this mind-boggling story by Alice Clark-Platts. It starts out much like any other thriller, introduces the plot to us, delves into the minds of the suspects and teases us with the flashbacks that are interwoven in the present-day narrative. But unlike the usual murder mystery, the plot of which is driven by the need to know who the culprit is, The Flower Girls opens with two girls being caught for a crime they supposedly committed. And in executing the plot this way, the author ensnares us. The need to know the rationale that propelled the perpetrators weighs heavily on our minds and so, I just couldn’t set this book down!

Image Courtesy – Goodreads

Two sisters, of age 10 years and 6 years respectively, get caught for the abduction and murder of a two-year old child. Laurel Bowman, the elder one, faces years of imprisonment and estrangement. But since Rosie was considered too young to be held responsible for such a crime, she escapes doing time and is given a new identity along with her parents, so that they may relocate. Now, nineteen years later, another case of a missing child threatens to upturn the lives of the Bowmans.

One third into the book and the main plot of the novel appeared to have been wrapped up, or so I kept thinking. But it was the determination of Detective Hillier that kept me on my toes, because she refused to be content with how the kid’s disappearance was solved. In fact, the novel would’ve been really dull if the present day mystery had not been tied up to the case of the Flower Girls.

You should be aware that it deals with some sensitive topics like child abuse, kidnapping and torture. So keep that in mind before you start reading. The chapters are really short and that helps us transition from one scene to another; thereby, keeping up the pace of the novel. Alice Clark-Platts’ writing style in this one is marked by long sentences and subtle indications that really drive you insane with anticipation. I particularly enjoyed reading the chapters that were set in the 90s because they had such a peculiar tone to them, almost creepy and disturbing. But it was the last two chapters that left me stunned beyond doubt!

There are quite a few characters in this book, many of whom play fleeting yet essential roles. I didn’t like Laurel and Rosie’s parents. They could’ve dealt with the whole thing in a much better manner, instead of abandoning their daughter. The representation of media, although true, is also something that irked me. In between, there comes a point where the pace of the book slows down and you begin to wonder what’s going to happen now. But rest assured that the end is worth the wait. It’ll likely knock you off your feet (that is if you haven’t guessed it already). I had a feeling about what really transpired but it made no sense, so I didn’t bank on that theory and allowed myself to be persuaded otherwise.

The fact that I sat all day and finished this book speaks volumes about how compelling it is. And so, I urge you to read it. While it is not going to be featured on my favorite books of all time list, this is a story you shouldn’t pass up reading.

★ ★ ★ .75

Thank you Bloomsbury India for sending me a copy of this book in exchange of an honest review.

Published by Meera Nair

A 27 year-old freelance Content Writer, who spends all her free time ensconced in the pages of a book or writing to her heart's content about topics that excite the creative spirit in her.

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